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Atlantic White Cedar


Large Atlantic White Cedar
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Little AWC Sapplings


Atlantic White Cedar Being Measured for an Experiment
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Log Home made of Atlantic White Cedar

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Atlantic White Cedar, Chamaecyparis thyoides (L, BSP), is an obligate wetland tree that grows up and down the Atlantic Coast, reaching from Southern Maine to Central Florida (Little 1950), and historically west to the Mississippi (Eleuterius and Jones 1972). Atlantic White Cedar (AWC) typically grows in peat, or soils that have thick layers of organic matter, offering many ecosystem services.

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Buildings made of Atlantic white cedar (AWC) (Medford Lakes, Burlington County, NJ). (Panel A) Cabin with the logs installed with the bark attached, indicating natural resistance to rot and/or insects. Few tree species demonstrate this characteristic. In most cases, if the bark remains intact, it is quickly attacked by fungi and insects, and soon detaches from the log. (Panel B). The Protestant Community Church, “Cathedral of the Woods”. Photo: Bob Williams (Land Dimensions Engineering, Glassboro, NJ).

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Atlantic white cedar seedlings (AWC) grown one season in a Hiko 265 tray (Stuewe & Sons, Tangent, Oregon). Container volume was 16 cubic inches (1.85 x 1.85 x 5.9 inches). Each tray has 28 cells. These trays yield high quality, well balanced, and relatively large AWC seedlings in 6- to 9-month production cycles. Ruler is 6 inches long. Photo: Eric Hinesley (NC State University).

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Flashboard riser used to control water levels on Pocosin Lakes NWR. This unit has two tubes (6 to 8 feet in diameter), and is 40 feet long. Frames in the front hold large boards or panels to raise or lower the water level, as needed. UnitsPhoto: Eric Hinesley (NC State Univ.).